71 Foods To Buy When You’re Broke with Recepies

Foods To Buy When You’re Broke

Eating healthy and saving money can often seem like conflicting goals, but it is possible to enjoy delicious and satisfying meals even on a tight budget.

Here is a list of 71 cheap foods that you can buy when you’re broke, along with their approximate cost and some recipe ideas to inspire you.

  1. Rice (5 lbs for $2.50) – Use it as a base for stir-fries, make a batch of fried rice, or add it to soups and stews.
  2. Pasta (1 lb for $1) – Toss with marinara sauce and vegetables for a quick and easy pasta dish, or try making homemade mac and cheese.
  3. Potatoes (10 lbs for $2.50) – Roast, mash, or make homemade potato chips.
  4. Canned tomatoes (14.5 oz for $0.79) – Use them to make sauces, soups, and stews.
  5. Canned beans (15 oz for $0.79) – Add them to soups, make a batch of homemade refried beans, or use them as the base for vegetarian chili.
  6. Frozen vegetables (16 oz for $1.50) – Use them to add nutrition and bulk to soups, stews, and casseroles.
  7. Eggs (dozen for $1.50) – Make a frittata, scramble them for breakfast, or use them to make homemade mayonnaise.
  8. Peanut butter (18 oz for $2.50) – Spread it on toast, mix it into smoothies, or use it to make peanut sauce for stir-fries.
  9. Chicken breasts (3 lbs for $6) – Grill, bake, or roast them for an easy protein-packed meal.
  10. Ground beef (1 lb for $3) – Make burgers, meatballs, or a batch of tacos.
  11. Oatmeal (18 oz for $2) – Make a batch of oatmeal raisin cookies, add it to smoothies for a protein boost, or use it as a base for homemade granola bars.
  12. Apples (3 lbs for $3) – Make applesauce, slice them for a snack, or add them to salads.
  13. Bananas (1 lb for $0.50) – Make banana bread, freeze them for smoothies, or slice them for a healthy topping on oatmeal or yogurt.
  14. Carrots (2 lbs for $1) – Grate them for carrot cake, roast them for a side dish, or add them to soups and stews.
  15. Onions (3 lbs for $1.50) – Use them as a base for soups and stews, roast them for a side dish, or slice them for homemade onion rings.
  16. Cabbage (2 lbs for $1) – Make coleslaw, add it to stir-fries, or use it as a base for homemade sauerkraut.
  17. Broccoli (1 lb for $1.50) – Roast it for a side dish, add it to stir-fries, or blend it into smoothies.
  18. Spinach (1 lb for $1) – Add it to salads, use it as a base for homemade pesto, or mix it into scrambled eggs.
  19. Lemons (3 for $1) – Use them to make homemade lemonade, add them to salads and marinades, or use them to flavor fish and chicken dishes.
  20. Lentils (1 lb for $1) – Make a batch of lentil soup, use them as a base for homemade veggie burgers, or add them to salads for a protein boost.
  21. Tofu (14 oz for $1.50) – Grill it, add it to stir-fries, or use it as a base for homemade tofu feta.
  22. Canned tuna (5 oz for $0.50) – Make a batch of tuna salad, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade tuna patties.
  23. Salmon (1 lb for $6) – Grill it, bake it, or use it to make homemade salmon cakes.
  24. Sardines (3.75 oz for $1) – Use them as a topping for crackers, add them to salads, or use them to make homemade sardine pate.
  25. Milk (gallon for $2.50) – Use it to make homemade yogurt, add it to smoothies, or use it as a base for homemade ice cream.
  26. Cheese (8 oz for $3) – Grate it for salads and casseroles, slice it for sandwiches, or use it to make homemade queso dip.
  27. Yogurt (32 oz for $2) – Use it as a base for smoothies, add it to oatmeal, or use it to make homemade popsicles.
  28. Bread (loaf for $1) – Make toast, sandwiches, or homemade croutons.
  29. Tortillas (10 for $1) – Make tacos, quesadillas, or homemade chips.
  30. Peanuts (16 oz for $3) – Use them to make peanut butter, add them to homemade granola, or use them as a topping for stir-fries.
  31. Almonds (16 oz for $6) – Make homemade almond butter, add them to oatmeal and granola, or use them as a topping for salads.
  32. Cashews (16 oz for $6) – Make homemade cashew milk, add them to homemade granola bars, or use them as a topping for stir-fries.
  33. Sunflower seeds (16 oz for $3) – Add them to homemade granola, use them as a topping for salads and stir-fries, or use them to make homemade sunflower seed butter.
  34. Flaxseeds (16 oz for $3) – Add them to oatmeal and smoothies, use them as an egg substitute in baking, or use them to make homemade flaxseed crackers.
  35. Sesame seeds (16 oz for $3) – Use them as a topping for stir-fries and salads, add them to homemade granola, or use them to make homemade sesame seed butter.
  36. Chia seeds (16 oz for $5) – Add them to oatmeal and smoothies, use them as an egg substitute in baking, or use them to make homemade chia seed pudding.
  37. Quinoa (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade quinoa burgers.
  38. Bulgur (1 lb for $1) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade bulgur balls.
  39. Millet (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade millet bowls.
  40. Wheat berries (1 lb for $2) – Use them as a base for salads, add them to soups and stews, or use them to make homemade wheat berry bowls.
  41. Barley (1 lb for $1.50) – Use it as a base for soups and stews, add it to salads, or use it to make homemade barley risotto.
  42. Cornmeal (1 lb for $0.50) – Use it to make homemade cornbread, use it as a coating for fried foods, or use it to make homemade polenta.
  43. Buckwheat (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade buckwheat pancakes.
  44. Steel-cut oats (1 lb for $2) – Make a batch of steel-cut oatmeal, use them as a base for homemade granola bars, or add them to smoothies for a protein boost.
  45. Farro (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade farro bowls.
  46. Kamut (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade kamut bowls.
  47. Freekeh (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade freekeh bowls.
  48. Teff (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade teff bowls.
  49. Amaranth (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade amaranth bowls.
  50. Sorghum (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade sorghum bowls.
  51. Millet (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade millet bowls.
  52. Spelt (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade spelled bowls.
  53. Job’s tears (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade Job’s tears bowls.
  54. Einkorn (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade einkorn bowls.
  55. Wild rice (1 lb for $4) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade wild rice bowls.
  56. Black rice (1 lb for $4) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade black rice bowls.
  57. Brown rice (1 lb for $1) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade brown rice bowls.
  58. White rice (1 lb for $1) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade white rice bowls.
  59. Jasmine rice (1 lb for $1) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade jasmine rice bowls.
  60. Basmati rice (1 lb for $1.50) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade basmati rice bowls.
  61. Arborio rice (1 lb for $2) – Use it to make homemade risotto, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade arborio rice bowls.
  62. Sushi rice (1 lb for $1.50) – Use it to make homemade sushi, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade sushi rice bowls.
  63. Calrose rice (1 lb for $1.50) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade calrose rice bowls.
  64. Sticky rice (1 lb for $2) – Use it to make homemade sushi, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade sticky rice bowls.
  65. Sweet rice (1 lb for $2) – Use it to make homemade sushi, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade sweet rice bowls.
  66. Glutinous rice (1 lb for $2) – Use it to make homemade sushi, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade glutinous rice bowls.
  67. Red cargo rice (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade red cargo rice bowls.
  68. Black glutinous rice (1 lb for $2) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade black glutinous rice bowls.
  69. Wild pecan rice (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade wild pecan rice bowls.
  70. Wild pecan jasmine rice (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade wild pecan jasmine rice bowls.
  71. Red jasmine rice (1 lb for $3) – Use it as a base for salads, add it to soups and stews, or use it to make homemade red jasmine rice bowls.

With these cheap and nutritious foods on hand, you can create a wide variety of tasty and budget-friendly meals. Whether you’re looking for a quick snack or a hearty dinner, there are plenty of options to choose from.

The top 5 budget-friendly foods to always have on hand

Eating healthy and delicious meals on a budget is possible with a little planning and creativity. One key to saving money on your grocery bills is to stock up on budget-friendly foods that are both nutritious and versatile. Here are the top 5 budget-friendly foods that you should always have on hand:

  • Rice: Rice is a cheap and filling grain that has a long shelf life. It can be paired with a variety of proteins and vegetables to make a complete meal.
  • Beans: Beans are a great source of protein and can be bought in bulk for a lower price. They can be used to make a variety of dishes such as soups, stews, and veggie burgers.
  • Canned tomatoes and tomato sauce: These pantry staples are a cheap source of protein and can be used to make a variety of dishes such as pasta sauces, soups, and stews.
  • Frozen vegetables: Fresh vegetables can be expensive, especially out of season. Frozen vegetables are a cost-effective alternative and are often just as nutritious as fresh ones. Plus, they have a longer shelf life and are convenient to use in a pinch.
  • Eggs: Eggs are a cheap source of protein and can be cooked in a variety of ways. They can be used to make omelets, frittatas, and scrambles, and can even be used as a binder in recipes like meatballs and veggie burgers.

By keeping these budget-friendly foods on hand, you’ll be able to save money on your grocery bills while still eating healthy and delicious meals.

Cheap and nutritious staples for a tight budget

Eating healthy doesn’t have to break the bank. By choosing cheap, nutritious staples, it is possible to eat well even on a tight budget. Here are some budget-friendly foods that you should stock up on:

  • Rice and beans: These two staples can be bought in bulk and have a long shelf life. They are also a great source of protein and can be paired with a variety of vegetables for a complete meal.
  • Frozen vegetables: Fresh vegetables can be expensive, especially out of season. Frozen vegetables are a cost-effective alternative and are often just as nutritious as fresh ones. Plus, they have a longer shelf life and are convenient to use in a pinch.
  • Canned tomatoes and tomato sauce: These pantry staples can be used to make a variety of dishes such as pasta sauces, soups, and stews. They are a cheap source of protein and can be paired with other inexpensive ingredients like beans and rice.
  • Eggs: Eggs are a cheap source of protein and can be cooked in a variety of ways. They can be used to make omelets, frittatas, and scrambles, and can even be used as a binder in recipes like meatballs and veggie burgers.
  • Oats: Oats are a cheap and versatile grain that can be used to make oatmeal, granola, and even baked goods like cookies and bread. They are a great source of fiber and can help keep you feeling full and satisfied.

By incorporating these budget-friendly staples into your meals, you can eat healthy and nutritious food without breaking the bank.

Frozen vs. fresh: which is the better value?

When it comes to buying produce, many people wonder whether it’s better to choose fresh or frozen. While both have their benefits, it’s important to consider the price, convenience, and nutritional value when deciding which is the better value.

Fresh produce is often more expensive than its frozen counterparts, especially out of season. It can also spoil more quickly, leading to food waste. However, some people believe that fresh produce has a better taste and texture.

On the other hand, frozen produce is generally cheaper and has a longer shelf life. It is also convenient because it can be stored in the freezer and used as needed. Additionally, frozen produce is often picked at the peak of ripeness and then flash-frozen, which can help preserve its nutritional value.

So which is the better value? It ultimately depends on your personal preferences and budget. If you’re looking to save money and reduce food waste, frozen produce may be the way to go. If you prioritize taste and texture, you may prefer fresh produce. Ultimately, the most important thing is to get a variety of fruits and vegetables into your diet, whether they are fresh or frozen.

The benefits of meal planning and bulk buying

you can save money, reduce food waste, save time, eat healthier, and increase convenience. These practices can help you stick to your budget while still eating nutritious and delicious meals. To get started with meal planning, try setting aside a few hours each week to plan out your meals and make a grocery list. Then, head to the store and stock up on the ingredients you need for the week. With a little bit of planning and organization, you’ll be well on your way to saving money and eating well on a budget.

Cheap sources of protein for the broke foodie

Eating a healthy, balanced diet can sometimes seem like a luxury, especially if you’re on a tight budget. However, it’s important to remember that getting enough protein is essential for maintaining muscle mass, supporting a healthy metabolism, and feeling satisfied after meals. If you’re a broke foodie looking for cheap sources of protein, here are a few options to add to your shopping list:

  • Eggs: Eggs are a versatile and affordable source of protein, with about 6 grams per large egg. They can be cooked in a variety of ways and are a staple in many dishes, from omelets to cakes.
  • Canned tuna: Canned tuna is a cheap and convenient source of protein that can be added to salads, sandwiches, and pasta dishes. It’s also a good source of omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Beans: Beans are a great source of protein, with about 7-8 grams per half-cup serving. They’re also rich in fiber, which can help keep you feeling full and satisfied. Beans can be added to soups, stews, and salads, or used as a replacement for meat in dishes like tacos and burritos.
  • Peanut butter: Peanut butter is a delicious and inexpensive source of protein, with about 8 grams per 2 tablespoon serving. It’s a great addition to toast, smoothies, and oatmeal, and can also be used as a substitute for meat in dishes like satay sauce and stir-fries.
  • Greek yogurt: Greek yogurt is a high-protein option with about 17 grams per 6 ounce serving. It’s a great choice for a snack or a topping for fruit and granola.
  • Chicken thighs: Chicken thighs are a cheaper alternative to chicken breasts and are just as high in protein, with about 10 grams per 3-ounce serving. They can be roasted, grilled, or used in soups and stews.
  • Cottage cheese: Cottage cheese is a good source of protein, with about 14 grams per half-cup serving. It’s a versatile option that can be eaten as a snack or used in recipes like dips and casseroles.

By incorporating these cheap sources of protein into your meals and snacks, you can still enjoy a healthy and satisfying diet without breaking the bank.

Places to get free food when you’re broke

If you’re broke and struggling to afford food, it can be a stressful and overwhelming situation. However, there are options available to help you get the nourishment you need without spending any money. Here are a few places to find free food when you’re broke:

  • Food banks: Food banks are organizations that collect and distribute food to people in need. They often receive donations from grocery stores, farms, and other sources, and offer free food to anyone who needs it.
  • Soup kitchens: Soup kitchens are organizations that provide free meals to people in need, usually in the form of a hot lunch or dinner. Many are run by churches or other charitable organizations, and anyone is welcome to come and eat.
  • Pantries: Pantries are similar to food banks, but they typically offer a wider variety of food items and may also provide personal care items and household goods.
  • Community gardens: Community gardens are plots of land where people can grow their own food. Some are free and open to the public, and you may be able to find free produce by checking out your local community garden.
  • Freeganism: Freeganism is a lifestyle choice in which people try to minimize their reliance on consumer culture and reduce waste by scavenging for discarded food and other items. While this option may not be for everyone, it is a way to find free food and reduce your environmental impact.
  • Craigslist: While not specifically a source of free food, Craigslist can be a good place to find free or cheap items, including food. You may be able to find people giving away excess produce from their gardens or unopened food items that they no longer need.
  • Social media: Social media platforms like Facebook and Nextdoor can be a good way to connect with others in your community and find out about local resources for free food. You can also use them to advertise your own needs and see if anyone is able to help out.

Efficient ways to use up leftover ingredients

If you’re trying to reduce food waste and save money, using up leftover ingredients can be a great way to stretch your budget and prevent waste. Here are a few efficient ways to use up leftover ingredients:

  • Meal prep: One of the most efficient ways to use up leftover ingredients is to incorporate them into your meal prep for the week. For example, if you have leftover grilled chicken, you can use it in salads, sandwiches, and pasta dishes throughout the week.
  • Soups and stews: Another great way to use up leftover ingredients is to make soups and stews. These dishes are a great way to use up small amounts of leftover vegetables, grains, and proteins, and can be easily stored and reheated for quick and easy meals.
  • Frittatas and omelets: If you have leftover vegetables or cooked proteins, consider using them in frittatas or omelets. These dishes are a great way to use up small amounts of ingredients and are easy to customize with whatever you have on hand.
  • Stir-fries: Stir-fries are a great way to use up small amounts of leftover ingredients, as they can be customized with a variety of vegetables, grains, and proteins. Simply cook your ingredients in a pan with a little oil and your choice of seasonings, and serve over rice or noodles.
  • Smoothies: If you have leftover fruits or vegetables that are starting to go bad, consider blending them into smoothies. Smoothies are a great way to use up small amounts of ingredients and can be customized with your choice of protein powder, nut butter, and other add-ins.
  • Baked goods: Leftover ingredients like overripe bananas, apples, and berries can be used in baked goods like muffins, bread, and cakes. Simply mash or chop the ingredients and add them to your favorite recipe.

By using these efficient ways to use up leftover ingredients, you can reduce food waste, save money, and get creative in the kitchen.

Conclusion

When money is tight, it’s important to make every dollar count. By choosing affordable and nutritious foods like beans, rice, and frozen vegetables, you can stretch your budget and still eat well. Don’t forget to check for sales and discounts at your local grocery store, and consider purchasing generic or store-brand items to save even more. With a little planning and creativity, eating on a budget doesn’t have to mean sacrificing taste or nutrition. Happy shopping!